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Lithuania
Source
: National Report on the Implementation of the ITI and the PoA, 2010 and 2008 
Date
: 06/05/2011
National Report
:
 
Contact
: Arms Control and Terrorism Prevention Division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Email
: dovydas.spokauskas@urm.lt
 
 
 
 


National laws, regulations and administrative procedures:

Law on the Control of Arms and Ammunition (LCA). The Order of the Director of Weaponry fund No. 1A-79 of 30 November 2004 on Rules of Marking of Imported Arms into the territory of Republic of Lithuania, as amended on 25 April 2005

 

 
 
 


National Marking Practices:

After the adoption of the ITI and during preparations to report on its implementation, relevant state authorities have undertaken a review of existing national procedures with regard to their assessment and possible improvement in order to implement the provisions of the Instrument. The overall conclusion of the review has been that Lithuanian national legislation complies in principle with the requirement of the Instrument. According to Lithuanian legislation firearms and their essential parts should be marked with official abbreviation of the Republic of Lithuania – capital letters “LT” – the size of the marking should be 2-2,5 mm. The barrel of the firearms should be marked with abovementioned marking, in a way that it would not be mistaken for the identification number of the manufacturer. The imported essential parts of the firearm are marked separately according to the same requirements. Pursuant to Article 22 LCA, every manufacturer of arms and ammunition must mark ammunition with identifying marks of the manufacturer. Surplus, confiscated, collected or seized firearms, after confirmation by the Commission of Experts on their suitability for further use, are handed over to the Weaponry Fund, which marks them with letters “LT”, duly registers and puts for sale under the established procedure.

Marking at the time of import:

According to Article 7(2) LCA: “Firearms with rifled and smooth-bore barrels of categories A, B and C, which do not possess identification numbers shall be prohibited in the Republic of Lithuania”. Article 24 (3) (3) LCA prohibits selling firearms which do not possess identification numbers. Article 21(2)(10) LCA indicates that a licensee (producer, importer or exporter) must mark all firearms of category B, C and long single-shot shotguns of category D which are imported to the territory of the Republic of Lithuania. According to paragraph 4 of the abovementioned Order, all imported firearms in categories B, C (except pneumatic arms and arms with strings) and long single-shot shotguns of category D should be adequately marked with letters “LT”. Every importer has to assure that arms are adequately marked before they reach civil market or are transferred to third parties. Traders in arms and brokers are required to possess a licence from the Police Department and are permitted to import firearms of categories B, C and D only after marking them with letters “LT”. The following methods can be used for marking of imported firearms: laser engraving, engraving and rolling

Marking of SALW in the possession of government armed and security forces:

SALW of category A used by the Armed Forces have identification number, type and model of the weapon. All weapons purchased by the Armed Forces from 2009 must be marked with letters “LT”. The Police Forces use firearms that have markings indicating a name of the manufacturer (model), serial number, calibre and, in most cases, manufacturing state and year of manufacture. Since 2005 all guns procured by the Police Forces are marked with letters “LT”, indicating importing state.


Measures against the removal or alteration of markings:



 
 
 


Accurate and comprehensive records for all marked SALW within their territory:

The State Arms Register collects data on all types of arms, possessed by the armed forces, police and other special forces, arms possessed by natural persons or legal entities, imported, exported and destroyed arms. The Register contains information on the date of purchase (if the weapon is purchased by the Weaponry Fund); model, calibre, category, serial number; owner, ID number, address; history of transactions with an arm from its purchase to destruction. Data in the State Arms Register is kept until the firearms are destroyed. Afterwards it is transferred to the archives and kept for 75 years. Materiel Recourses Department of the Armed Forces is responsible for the gathering, analysis and record of information about all weapons used by Armed Forces. It systemises received data and annually provides this information to the National Weapons Register. Stocks held by armed forces are reviewed regularly to ensure that they meet the requirements of ITI.

 
 
 


Measures taken for undertaking traces and responding to tracing requests
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Operational Informaton Exchange:

Lithuanian national office of Interpol shares information with Interpol national bureaus or through Interpol General Secretariat by submitting inquires concerning arms identification or detection of individuals involved in illicit arms trade.

Needs and Request for Assistance::
Lithuania would suggest that IWETS could be upgraded into a database on forming about missing firearms. It would allow investigators from member countries to get additional information by performing checks on firearms in the existing database with a purpose to identify the origin of an particular firearm.

Implementation challenges and opportunities:

Lithuania considers that Interpol’s Weapons Electronic Tracing System (IWeTS) could be extendedLithuania fully supports the existing the INTERPOL Weapons Tracing System (IWETS) and considers it could be extended in order to provide proper tools for the law enforcement agencies against illicit arms trade. This database could not only enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illict SALW but could also provide information on weapons which are being searched for. This database could not only enable States to identify and trace, in a timely and reliable manner, illict SALW but could also provide information on weapons which are being searched for. Therefore Lithuania would suggest that IWETS could be upgraded into a database on forming about missing firearms. It would allow investigators from member countries to get additional information by performing checks on firearms in the existing database with a purpose to identify the origin of an particular firearm.

 
 
 

Lithuania was elected Vice-President of the Open-ended Working Group to Negotiate the ITI and co-sponsored the draft General Assembly decision 60/519, by which the ITI was adopted.