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Mexico
Source
: National Report on the Implementation of the PoA and the ITI, 2008 
Date
: 11/07/2008
National Report
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Contact
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Email
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National laws, regulations and administrative procedures:


 

 
 
 


National Marking Practices:

Marking at the time of import:

Information on the importer is engraved on imported arms and submitted to the Federal Weapons Registry.

Marking of SALW in the possession of government armed and security forces:

All firearms in the possession of government armed and security forces are marked at the time of manufacture with information on the manufacturer, calibre, model, serial number, and country of manufacture.


Measures against the removal or alteration of markings:

Even though certain measures have been adopted to prevent the alteration of markings (e.g. by reproducing markings on various essential components of a weapon), weapon owners nevertheless manage to alter markings. Mexico has established a ballistic fingerprinting register with a view to preventing this practice and has suggested that an inter-American register should be created.

 
 
 


Accurate and comprehensive records for all marked SALW within their territory:

In accordance with the Federal Firearms and Explosives Act and its regulatory legislation, the Federal Weapons Registry and Explosives Control Office monitors all weapons in Mexico by having them recorded in the Federal Weapons Registry

 
 
 


Measures taken for undertaking traces and responding to tracing requests
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Operational Informaton Exchange:

One of the firearm tracing procedures that the Government of Mexico has sought to strengthen is the ongoing exchange of information with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives on weapons seized in Mexico. Mexico has kept abreast of standard-setting within the framework of the Organization of American States — specifically, the Consultative Committee established under the Inter-American Convention against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials — and of the adoption of model legislation on marking and tracing. As Secretary Pro Tempore of the Consultative Committee and as an advocate of the Convention, Mexico organized the Second Conference of States Parties, held in Mexico City from 20 to 21 February 2008. The Tlatelolco Commitment, adopted at the Conference, provides for the establishment of a process of consultations to create, in the short term, a system for exchanging information on firearms and ammunition confiscated from organized crime, including the possibility of a hemispheric register or regional, subregional and national registers.

Needs and Request for Assistance::

Implementation challenges and opportunities: