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Open-ended Meeting of Governmental Experts

PoA Implementation Kit





Brokering Control












 
 

New Zealand
 

 
   
 
2016 : English
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2003 : English
 
 
2008 - Third Biennial Meeting of States, July :
English
 
     
   
 
     
 
13/01/06 : ARMS TRADE IMPACT ON DEVELOPMENT, TRANSFER CONTROLS, BROKERING ADDRESSED, AS PREPARATORY BODY DEBATES KEY ISSUES FOR SMALL ARMS REVIEW CONFERENCE.
 
 
     
   

   
 
     
 
   
   
   
 
 
     
 
Collection and destruction
  - New Zealand's firearms legislation features a "permanent amnesty provision" for pistols and restricted weapons. (National Report 2008) - NZ Police has destroyed its surplus stock of 750 rifles as part of a rifle replacement programme. 50 have been retained for the purposes of firearm safety training delivered by the Mountain Safety Council. (National Report, 2007)
Public awareness
  - In 2008/2009 Police invested $265,000 in the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council - the civilian organisation responsible for promoting the safe use of firearms in the community. - National Point of Contact attended the New Zealand Defence Industry Forum in October 2009 and coordination and hosting of interagency meetings to raise awareness of export controls on firearms, parts and ammunition among exporters and customs brokers. (National Report, 2010) - Presentation to national firearms owners on SALW issues, including Programme of Action (October 2007). - The New Zealand Police continues to consult with the firearms-using community on the development of legislation, policy and practice aimed at enhancing the safe use and control of firearms. Representatives of firearms owner groups were informally consulted during the development stages of the Arms Amendment Bill (No 3) currently before Parliament (National Report, 2008) - In the last two years the Police have invested approximately NZ$200,000 into promoting the licensing, security and safe use of firearms. - Outreach to exporters and customs brokers to raise awareness of export controls on firearms, parts and ammunition through publications, seminars and visits to individual businesses. (National Report, 2007)
Research/Capacity-building/Seminars/Workshops
  SEMINARS-WORKSHOPS - In February 2006, the New Zealand Police co-hosted, with the Mountain Safety Council and the Council of Licensed Firearms Owners, an international firearms safety seminar. The New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID) paid for representatives from the Pacific to attend. This helped to build on New Zealand's involvement at the UN Regional Seminar on SALW for the South Pacific in Nadi, 18-20 August 2004. (National Report, 2007) - The outcomes of the 2006 conference continue to inform the development of policy and practice in relation to SALW, including the 2008 – 2012 New Zealand Suicide Prevention Action Plan. (National Report, 2010)
 
 
     
 
UN Participation
- Co-sponsorship on the UNGA resolution on an arms trade treaty (ATT) in 2006.
Cooperation with civil society and NGOs
- New Zealand contributed funding to IANSA to enable them to establish a temporary office in New York during the Review Conference in 2006. - The New Zealand delegation to the Review Conference included a representative each from Oxfam, IANSA and the New Zealand Council of Licensed Firearms Owners Inc (COLFO). (National Report, 2007).
 
 
     
 
Definition (including closely associated activities and extraterritoriality):
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Optional elements for national legislation (registration, record-keeping, licensing, related legislation, jurisdiction, penalties):
There are few arms brokers based in New Zealand and there are no specific controls on brokering although as brokers are considered to offer firearms for sale they are included within the regulations covering firearms dealers. No person is allowed to set up business selling, or manufacturing for sale, firearms, airguns, pistols or restricted weapons without a licence issued by the Police. Those licences must be endorsed to allow possession of pistols, military-style semi-automatic (MSSA) firearms or restricted weapons if the business concerned deals in those items.
Operational information exchange (including a) Cooperation on activities violating UNSC arms embargoes; and b) Cooperation with relevant organizations, e.g. WCO, Interpol, the UN):
Cooperation and measures within a regional Organization:
National needs (Assistance in capacity building):
Notes:
 
 
 
     
Source : Report on the Implementation of the PoA, 2008 & 2010
Date : 11/7/2008
National laws, regulations and administrative procedures:
Arms Act 1983
National marking practices:
Guns produced in New Zealand are marked, and there is currently an Arms Amendment Bill (No. 3) before Parliament that will make it an offence for firearms manufacturers to “fail to place on a firearm or part of a firearm manufactured… an identifying marking”.

Pistols, military-style semi-automatic (MSSAs) firearms and restricted weapons (prescribed by government) must be stamped with an identifying mark when transferred from one civilian to another if the firearm in question does not already feature such a mark. Markings must be retained and recorded on transfer

There is no standard way in which firearms are marked in New Zealand. Generally, such weapons are marked with make, model, calibre and serial number. Marks are located in various places, and various parts can be marked differently. New Zealand Police have considered whether further approved standards for manufacturing and marking firearms could be implemented.
Marking at the time of import:
Marking of SALW in the possession of government armed and security forces:
Weapons held by the Police and the New Zealand Defence Force are already marked in a way that enables their identification and tracing. Police use weapons produced commercially, which already bear markings. All items held by the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) are serial numbered, usually by the manufacturer. If not numbered by the manufacturer, they are allocated an NZDF control number, and in some cases may have both. They are held on the NZDF Logistics Management System by individual serial numbers, and their location is recorded in terms of the unit to which they are issued.
Measures against the removal or alteration of markings:
The Arms Amendment Bill (No. 3) currently before New Zealand Parliament includes a specific offence of altering, falsifying, obliterating or removing an identifying marking on a firearm (except for some lawful purpose).
Accurate and comprehensive records for all marked SALW within their territory:
New Zealand maintains records of lawfully possessed pistols, military-style semi-automatics (MSSAs) and restricted weapons through both an import permitting and change of possession permitting regime. The record of pistols, restricted weapons and MSSAs is maintained indefinitely. New Zealand does not maintain a register of all firearms (eg. sporting firearms). However, as the vast majority of such firearms are imported into New Zealand, details of such weapons are in practice captured as part of the import process managed by Police.
Measures taken for undertaking traces and responding to tracing requests:
The New Zealand Defence Force track/trace and serial manage all SALW via a combination of a computerised Enterprise Resource Planning System (SAP), computerised logistic systems and manual paper systems. This advanced process includes some SALW sub-components and all ammunition.
Operational information exchange:
The Oceanic Customs Organisation (OCO) performs an important coordination role in the Pacific. OCO members submit reports of seizures, methods of transportation and methods of detection to the Intelligence Section of the New Zealand Customs Service, which produces and publishes the report on behalf of the OCO. Customs Asia Pacific Enforcement Reporting System (CAPERS) is currently operating throughout the Pacific and Asian regions. CAPERS is an international based information and reporting system which is used in a number of OCO member countries throughout the Pacific region.
Needs and request for assistance:
Implementation challenges and opportunities:
New Zealand’s arms control regime generally complies with the requirements of the International Tracing Instrument. The passage of relevant regulations under the Arms Act, which are not yet in place but are currently being considered, would strengthen compliance.
Notes:
 
 
     
 
Multilateral
- The Oceanic Customs Organisation members submit reports of seizures, methods of transportation and methods of detection to the Intelligence Section of the New Zealand Customs Service, which produces and publishes the report on behalf of the OCO. - The Customs Asia Pacific Enforcement Reporting System (CAPERS) is currently operating throughout the Pacific and Asian regions. CAPERS is an international based information and reporting system which is used in a number of OCO member countries throughout the Pacific region. CAPERS was developed by the United States Customs Service. (National Report, 2008)

 
 
     
 
Regional projects
- The New Zealand Customs Service assisted with the establishment of a permanent base of operations for the Oceania Customs Organisation and has established in its Head Office a Pacific Liaison Officer to strengthen and develop relationships between the New Zealand Customs Service and the Pacific Island Customs administrations and regional organisations. (National Report, 2007)